Resources

Diversity Training and Education Among MD’s and Residents: Part 1
By Zalak Shah

InCrowd conducted 2 surveys to 209 attending physicians and 454 medical residents to understand what their perspective is regarding the status of diversity training and education they receive and what their experiences are in the professional environment. In the next few articles, we’ll discuss the responses and findings of these surveys.

There was a significant tip towards male responders as opposed to female, transgender men, transgender women, non-binary, and those who preferred not to answer the question. Over the next few weeks, we will publish and discuss the various results and analysis of these surveys and the impact diversity training and conversation has on the healthcare environment today.

55.5% of our medical resident responders identified as men, 43.8% identified as women and <1% either identified as Transgender women or preferred to not answer the question.

Of the total responders, 59% were Caucasian, 24% were Asian American, 9% African American, 8% Hispanic/Latinx.

Of the attending physician responders, 53.1% identified as men, 45.5% as women and ~1% as Non-binary or preferred not to answer the questions. 66% of these responders were Caucasian, 22% Asians American, 7% Hispanic/Latinx, 5% African American.

When asked about the kind of training and education they have received against racial bias and discrimination, around two-thirds of all the respondents stated that they have learned about Perspective Taking (“Putting yourself in other person’s shoes”) and Individuation (Seeing the person as an individual rather than a stereotype). Overall, almost all the responders had received some training to address discrimination and provide impartial clinical care to their patients. There were 15 medical resident and 7 attending physician  responders who stated that they have received no such training.

As the healthcare population becomes more and more diverse, it is imperative that our providers are well-trained to:

1. Address various issues that affect specific patient groups

2. Interact with marginalized groups with empathy and equality

3. Provide an unbiased medical care to the patients and build a sense of trust with them

The results for this question show that there are steps taken to train the providers to make the healthcare system more inclusive, however, more needs to be done to make sure that the scope of the training is expanded and provided to all current and potential healthcare providers.

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